Articles | Volume 10, issue 2
https://doi.org/10.5194/dwes-10-83-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/dwes-10-83-2017
Research article
 | 
14 Sep 2017
Research article |  | 14 Sep 2017

Identifying (subsurface) anthropogenic heat sources that influence temperature in the drinking water distribution system

Claudia M. Agudelo-Vera, Mirjam Blokker, Henk de Kater, and Rob Lafort

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Latest update: 20 Apr 2024
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Short summary
Water temperature in the drinking water distribution system (DWDS) and at the customers' taps approaches the surrounding soil temperature at 1 m in depth. In the Netherlands drinking water is distributed without additional residual disinfectant and drinking water temperature at the customers' tap should not exceed 25 ºC. Some urban infrastructures are heat sources and generate hot-spots. This article describes a method to find anthropogenic heat sources that influence temperature in the DWDS.