Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/dwes-2020-32
https://doi.org/10.5194/dwes-2020-32
15 Oct 2020
 | 15 Oct 2020
Status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Domestic water consumption pattern by urban households

Amarasingam Narmilan, Narmilan Puvanitha, Gnanachelvam Niroash, Muthucumaran Sugirtharan, and Ratnarajah Vasssanthini

Abstract. Water has been recognized as one of the most significant natural resources and crucial for health and wealth. The increased demand for water has imposed pressure on the water supply system, which has led to environmental problems such as over-exploitation of water resources and breaks in the balance of the ecosystem. Determining the behavior of domestic water consumers can facilitate a more proactive approach to water demand management, and serves as the foundation for the development of any intervention strategies that seek to bring about sustained and substantial reductions in domestic water consumption. This study tried to investigate household water consumption patterns and management practices along with comparing the effectiveness of different water management measures on reducing the water deficit of the district. The primary data was collected through a questionnaire survey from 75 households belonging to the urban area in Batticaloa District in Manmunai Pattu, Sri Lanka. The data were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The findings show that people with higher incomes in urban areas are using more water than people with lower incomes. The water usage depends on the living standards, family size, age, and education level of household members and the number of taps present in the household. It is believed that the results of the study would be beneficial for domestic water consumption in urban Batticaloa.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Amarasingam Narmilan, Narmilan Puvanitha, Gnanachelvam Niroash, Muthucumaran Sugirtharan, and Ratnarajah Vasssanthini

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Amarasingam Narmilan, Narmilan Puvanitha, Gnanachelvam Niroash, Muthucumaran Sugirtharan, and Ratnarajah Vasssanthini
Amarasingam Narmilan, Narmilan Puvanitha, Gnanachelvam Niroash, Muthucumaran Sugirtharan, and Ratnarajah Vasssanthini

Viewed

Total article views: 1,017 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
763 214 40 1,017 44 45
  • HTML: 763
  • PDF: 214
  • XML: 40
  • Total: 1,017
  • BibTeX: 44
  • EndNote: 45
Views and downloads (calculated since 15 Oct 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 15 Oct 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 923 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 920 with geography defined and 3 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 17 Jul 2024
Download

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Short summary
Determining the behavior of domestic water consumers can facilitate a more proactive approach to water demand management. The findings show that people with higher incomes in urban areas are using more water than people with lower incomes. The water usage depends on the living standards, family size, age, and education. Results showed that the total domestic water consumption is negatively correlated with education level.