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Drinking Water Engineering and Science An interactive open-access journal
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Volume 7, issue 1
Drink. Water Eng. Sci., 7, 63–72, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/dwes-7-63-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: CCWI 2013

Drink. Water Eng. Sci., 7, 63–72, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/dwes-7-63-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 16 Jun 2014

Research article | 16 Jun 2014

WaterMet2: a tool for integrated analysis of sustainability-based performance of urban water systems

K. Behzadian1,2, Z. Kapelan1, G. Venkatesh3, H. Brattebø4, and S. Sægrov3 K. Behzadian et al.
  • 1Centre for Water Systems, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK
  • 2Environmental Research Centre, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran
  • 3Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  • 4Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway

Abstract. This paper presents the "WaterMet2" model for long-term assessment of urban water system (UWS) performance which will be used for strategic planning of the integrated UWS. WaterMet2 quantifies the principal water-related flows and other metabolism-based fluxes in the UWS such as materials, chemicals, energy and greenhouse gas emissions. The suggested model is demonstrated through sustainability-based assessment of an integrated real-life UWS for a daily time-step over a 30-year planning horizon. The integrated UWS modelled by WaterMet2 includes both water supply and wastewater systems. Given a rapid population growth, WaterMet2 calculates six quantitative sustainability-based indicators of the UWS. The result of the water supply reliability (94%) shows the need for appropriate intervention options over the planning horizon. Five intervention strategies are analysed in WaterMet2 and their quantified performance is compared with respect to the criteria. Multi-criteria decision analysis is then used to rank the intervention strategies based on different weights from the involved stakeholders' perspectives. The results demonstrate that the best and robust strategies are those which improve the performance of both water supply and wastewater systems.

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